Media: Corporate Welfare Will Bring Back Jobs vs. Jobs Will Never Come Back

30 November 2016 — FAIR

NYT: Trump to Announce Carrier Plant Will Keep Jobs in USThe New York Times (11/29/16) declares that Carrier’s job announcement “signals that Mr. Trump is a different kind of Republican.”

The Carrier company’s announcement that, after exhortations from Donald Trump, it was going to move a thousand jobs overseas—rather than the 2,000 that it had previously planned to move—led New York Times reporter Nelson Schwartz (11/29/16) to declare that “Mr. Trump is a different kind of Republican, willing to take on big business, at least in individual cases”:

Just as only a confirmed anti-Communist like Richard Nixon could go to China, so only a businessman like Mr. Trump could take on corporate America without being called a Bernie Sanders–style socialist. If Barack Obama had tried the same maneuver, he’d probably have drawn criticism for intervening in the free market.

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Denied work, Britain’s poor have become ‘untermensch’ By Tony Gosling

8 November 2013 — RT

Millions of hardworking families can no longer afford a social life, shoes for their children, to go swimming or to the cinema. Not satisfied with their seventh home, brace of sports cars and servants, the rich are paying Tory politicians, press and the City to grind the faces of Britain’s poor into the dirt.

London Underground prepares mass closure of ticket offices By James Hatton and Paul Bond

3 September 2013 — WSWS

Recent disclosures have again confirmed London Underground management is planning to close all its 268 ticket offices over the next two years. Around 2,000 jobs are expected to be lost during that period, with job losses across the rail and underground network rising to 6,000 by 2020. The job losses are part of Transport for London (TfL) and London Conservative mayor Boris Johnson’s £7.6 billion cuts programme to the London transport budget.

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Video: The Impact of Robots: Abundance and the Need for Radical Structural Reform

1 September 2013 — Solidarity Economy

Marx anticipated the problem as capitalism’s systemic crisis, the growth in the ‘organic composition of capital’ (machines) in an inverse relation to ‘living labor’ (jobs). The way out, in the shorter run, is a social wage combined with shorter hours, and in the longer run, socialism on the path to a classless society. McAfee here sees the problem, if not the full solution. – Carl Davidson

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BBC welfare reform show breached impartiality guidelines

30 July 2013 — BBC

The Trust’s editorial standards committee said that while there was no evidence that Humphrys advocated the coalition government’s reforms, viewers were likely to have formed the impression that there was a “healthy supply of jobs overall” in the UK economy because no information was given on the ratio of jobs to applicants.

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The Other Elephant in the Room: Funding public interest news By Justin Schlosberg

9 July 2013 — New Left Project

As we reflect on the post-Leveson political furore, it is worth recalling Stuart Hall’s maxim that it is the way in which public problems are defined – rather than their proposed solutions – which exemplifies the exercise of real power in advanced capitalist democracies. 

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