Economics as a social science

5 December 2019 — Michael Roberts Blog

Recently, Benoît Cœuré, a leading French member of the Executive Board of the European Central Bank, delivered an address to economics students at the job forum of Paris School of Economics. He wanted to explain to the gathered students that becoming an economist was a great thing to do and paid well. “For many, a master’s degree is a natural step towards a PhD. And a PhD is essentially a promise of employment. In the United States, for example, the unemployment rate for PhD economists is about 0.8%, the lowest among all sciences.  Not a bad place to start from.”

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Video: Syria: Proxies, Pipelines and People

30 August 2013 — stopimperialism.com

Eric Draitser of StopImperialism.com appears on AMTV to discuss the current situation in Syria. He explains some of the motivations of key regional players and their Western backers in terms of economics and geopolitics.  Draitser examines various scenarios that could play out in the coming weeks and months depending on how events unfold on the ground and diplomatically. Additionally, he explores the discredited US narrative about the use of chemical weapons and the historical precedents for such lies.

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Book Review: Reality economics By Michael Hudson

19 December, <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>2012 — Michael Hudson

<div class=”meta” style=”font-family: Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; color: #444444; padding-left: 30px;”>A review of Norbert Häring and Niall Douglas, Economists and the Powerful (<strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>London: Anthem Press, <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>2012).
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Books: The Contradictions of “Real Socialism”

25 November 2012 — Monthly Review Press

The Conductor and the Conducted

<div class=”bookinfo”><strong class=”bookinfo”>What was “real <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>socialism”—the term which originated in twentieth-century <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>socialist societies for the purpose of distinguishing them from abstract, theoretical <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>socialism? In this volume, Michael A. Lebowitz considers the nature, tendencies, and contradictions of those societies. Beginning with the constant presence of shortages within “real <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>socialism,” Lebowitz searches for the inner relations which generate these patterns. He finds these, in particular, in what he calls “vanguard relations of production,” a relation which takes the apparent form of a social contract where workers obtain benefits not available to their counterparts in capitalism but lack the power to decide within the workplace and society.
<div class=”byline”><img class=”Thumbnail large alignright” style=”margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;” src=”http://monthlyreview.org/press/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/contradictions-of-real-socialism-300×452.jpg” alt=”The Contradictions of “Real Socialism”” width=”180″ height=”271″ />
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