Corporate Media Have Second Thoughts About Exiling Julian Assange From Journalism

5 June 2019 — FAIR

“Democracy dies in darkness,” reads the Washington Post slogan—though apparently sometimes it’s good to put people in prison for exposing government wrongdoing (4/11/19).

After British police arrested Julian Assange on April 11, the first instinct of corporate journalists was to perform a line-drawing exercise. In so doing, corporate media dutifully laid the groundwork for the US Department of Justice’s escalating political persecution of the WikiLeaks founder, and set the stage for a renewed assault on a free and independent press by the Trump administration.

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There’s Far More Diversity in Venezuela’s ‘Muzzled’ Media Than in US Corporate Press

20 May 2019 — FAIR

Presentacion-de-cifras-II-2018_05-12-2018.pdf

Time (4/16/19) joined in on the corporate media’s literary fad of fictionalized accounts of the Venezuelan crisis.

The international corporate media have long displayed a peculiar creativity with the facts in their Venezuela reporting, to the point that coverage of the nation’s crisis has become perhaps the world’s most lucrative fictional genre. Ciara Nugent’s recent piece for Time (4/16/19), headlined “‘Venezuelans Are Starving for Information’: The Battle to Get News in a Country in Chaos,” distinguished itself as a veritable masterpiece of this literary fad.

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Media Setting Up Iran as New ‘Threat’ That Must Be Confronted By Janine Jackson

19 May 2019 — FAIR

Once again the Washington Post (WaPo: We're Drifting Toward War With Iran. Trumps Needs to Take a Diplomatic Way Out5/14/19) presents the United States as “drifting toward war”—this time with Iran.

The Washington Post editorial’s headline (5/14/19)  had the US “drifting” toward war with Iran—another example, as analyst Nima Shirazi quipped, of the “world’s superpower somehow having no agency over its own imperialism.”

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Media Cheer Assange’s Arrest By Alan MacLeod

18 April, 2019 — FAIR

Bloomberg depiction of Julian Assange (photo: Jack Taylor/Getty Images Europe)

Julian Assange was arrested inside the Ecuadorian embassy in London on April 11. The Australian-born co-founder of Wikileaks had been trapped in the building since 2012 after taking refuge there. He was immediately found guilty of failing to surrender to a British court, and was taken to Belmarsh prison. An extradition to the United States is widely seen as imminent by corporate media, who have, by and large, strongly approved of these events.

Michael Isikoff Cuts His Losses at ‘Russian Roulette’ By Ray McGovern

19 December 2018 — Consortium News

Michael Isikoff, one of the biggest proponents of the Russia-gate story now says that Robert Mueller’s investigation is “not where a lot of people would like it to be,” says Ray McGovern.

By Ray McGovern
Special to Consortium News

Last Saturday, veteran Washington journalist Michael Isikoff began a John Ehrlichman/Watergate-style “modified limited hangout” regarding the embarrassing overreach in his Russia-gate “collusion” reporting. He picked an unctuous, longtime fan, radio host John Ziegler, to help him put some lipstick on the proverbial pig. Even so, the interview did not go so well.

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WaPo Claims American “Tortured Then Executed” in Syria – Admits No Evidence By Tony Cartalucci

16 December 2018 — Land Destroyer

December 15, 2018 (Tony Cartalucci – LD) – A particularly scurrilous op-ed appeared in the pages of the Washington Post accusing the Syrian government of detaining, torturing, then executing an American citizen, Layla Shweikani.
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Jeff Bezos’ Paper Tells You Not to Worry About Those Billionaires by Dean Baker

26 July 2018 — FAIR

WaPo: In the age of inequality, Goldman’s CEO offers an unexpected lesson

Washington Post

Just when you thought economic commentary in the Washington Post couldn’t get any more insipid, Roger Lowenstein proves otherwise. In a business section “perspective” (7/20/18), he tells readers:

But what if inequality is the wrong metric. Herewith a modest proposition: economic inequality is not the best yardstick. What we should be paying attention to is social mobility.

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Korean Voices Missing From Major Papers’ Opinions on Singapore Summit By Adam Johnson

21 June 2018 — FAIR

WaPo: Americans Have Figured It Out: North Korea Won!

The Washington Post‘s Jennifer Rubin (6/17/18) epitomized the zero-sum takes of US pundits.

In major-paper opinion coverage of the Singapore summit, the people with the most to lose and gain from the summit, the people whose nation was actually being discussed—Koreans—were almost uniformly ignored. 

Three major US papers—the New York TimesWashington Post and Wall Street Journal—had only one Korean-authored op-ed out of 41 opinion pieces on the subject of the Korean peace talks.

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The Empire’s Media and the Quest for Veto Authority in the Americas by Joe Emersberger

6 June 2018 — FAIR

CSM: Pence replacing Trump at Peru summit. But name that matters most is Monroe.

Christian Science Monitor (4/11/18)

In April, the Summit of the Americas in Peru predictably led to articles fretting about declining US influence in the Western Hemisphere.  Analysts were quoted (Christian Science Monitor, 4/11/18) worrying that Trump’s belligerent and racist outbursts would weaken Washington’s power in the region.

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Media Debate Best Way to Dominate Iran By Gregory Shupak

12 May 2018 — FAIR

The New York Times‘ Bret Stephens (5/8/18) is glad Trump canceled the Iran deal because that allows the US to threaten Iran with “economic ruin and possible war.”

The debate in the New York Times and Washington Post over President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), better known as the Iran deal, revolves around which tactics America should use to dominate Iran.

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