Media Lens: The Great Libya War Fraud

3 October 2016 — Media Lens

National newspapers were ‘unimpressed by Jeremy Corbyn’s victory’ in the Labour leadership election, Roy Greenslade noted in the Guardian, surprising no-one. Corbyn secured almost 62% of the 506,000 votes cast, up from the 59% share he won in 2015, ‘with virtually no press backing whatsoever’.

In reality, of course, Corbyn did not just lack press backing. He won in the face of more than one year of relentless corporate media campaigning to politically, ethically, professionally, psychologically and even sartorially discredit him. That Corbyn survived is impressive. That he won again, increased his vote-share, and took Labour Party membership from 200,000 to more than 500,000, is astonishing.

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NYT's Iraq War History, Still Misleading By Peter Hart

16 October 2013 — FAIR Blog

nyt-oustedThe New York Times had an interesting piece on October 14 telling the story of José Bustani, the former director general of the intergovernmental Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, who was ousted by the United States as part of the run up to the Iraq War.

As the story goes (and was reported at the time), Bustani had been working on getting Iraq  to agree to join the Chemical Weapons Convention. This was an unwelcome development for the Bush administration, since it could complicate efforts to invade Iraq based in part on its chemical weapons stockpile.

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G8: Cameron contemplates a military dictatorship in Syria

21 June 2013 — Voltaire Network

According to the Times of London, British Prime Minister David Cameron suggested to his NATO partners the idea of assassinating President Bashar al-Assad and organizing a military coup in Damascus. [1]

In such a scenario, the new Syrian leader would break with the anti-Israeli resistance, while most of the Baathist apparatus would remain in power.

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Apologists for Israel take top posts at BBC By Amena Saleem

23 April 2013 — The Electronic Intifada

Israel’s occupation is airbrushed from the BBC’s coverage.

The American poet T.S. Eliot wrote that “April is the cruelest month.” The phrase springs to mind in April 2013, the month that a new director-general took up his post at the BBC and, within two weeks, had installed a line-up of hardline Zionists at the top of the world’s largest publicly-funded news organization.

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Media Lens: Death Of A Hero By David Cromwell

14 January 2013 — Media Lens

The General, The Media Adulation And The Forgotten Victims

One measure of a society’s honesty is what it says about its political and military leaders when they die. Are the deceased leader’s perceived virtues exalted, while any blemishes are airbrushed out of the picture? Recent media coverage following the death of General Norman “Stormin’ ”Schwarzkopf, the Allied military commander during the Persian Gulf War in 1991, is a case in point.

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Media Lens: Won't Get Fooled Again? Hyping Syria's WMD 'Threat' By: David Edwards

12 December, 2012 — Media Lens

Reading about crimes of state over many years, it is tempting to try to fathom the mind-set of political leaders. What actually is going on in their heads when they order sanctions that kill hundreds of thousands of children? What is in their hearts when they wage needless wars that shatter literally millions of lives? Are they desperately cruel, mindlessly stupid? Do they imagine they are living in a kind of hell where monstrous acts have to be committed to avoid even worse outcomes? Are they indifferent, focused on what will bring them short-term political and economic gain? Are they morally resigned, perceiving themselves as essentially powerless in the face of invincible political and economic forces (‘If I didn’t do it, someone else would.’)?

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