Key Mistakes Sway Jury in Zimmerman Trial: Jury Prevented from Considering Race and “First Aggressor” By Marjorie Cohn

19 July 2013 — Global Research

A Southern jury of six women – none of them black – found 28-year-old George Zimmerman’s shooting of unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin to be justifiable homicide because he acted in self-defense. 

The jurors were prohibited from considering race. They were instructed only on the parts of self-defense law that helped Zimmerman, and the chief police investigator improperly testified that he believed Zimmerman.

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A United Nations For the Rest of Us, But Not For Israel By Mohamed Khodr

13 May 2013 — Veterans Today

“We Jews forced the Arabs to leave….Here was a people who lived on its own land for 1,300 years. We came and turned the native Arabs into tragic refugees. And still we dare to slander and malign them, to besmirch their name. Instead of being deeply ashamed of what we did and of trying to undo some of the evil we committed by helping these unfortunate refugees, we justify our terrible acts and even attempt to glorify them”
    –Nathan Chofshi, in Jewish Newsletter, February 9, 1959
 
“It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, then to put on the cloak of non- violence to cover Impotence”.
    –Mahatma Gandi

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Boston Bombing Involves Clearly Staged Carnage By Sheila Casey

8 May 2013 — Truth and Shadows

False flag theater: Boston bombing involves clearly staged carnage

“Does a compelling description of a terrorist attack, replete with ‘eyewitness accounts’ of the terrifying scene, and official pronouncements, constitute an actual event?” – Florida Atlantic University professor James Tracy.

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Obama Inauguration Day: Two Nobel Peace Laureates, “Drones Apart”. Martin Luther King: “From Every Mountainside, Let Freedom Ring.” By Felicity Arbuthnot

21 January, 2013Global Research

One day …
Children at school will ask:
What is war?
You will answer them.
You will tell them:
Those words are not used any more.
Like stagecoaches, galleys or slavery.
Words no longer meaningful … — (Martin Luther King,15th January 1929-4th April 1968.) Continue reading

Obama Inauguration Day: Two Nobel Peace Laureates, “Drones Apart”. Martin Luther King: “From Every Mountainside, Let Freedom Ring.” By Felicity Arbuthnot

21 January, 2013Global Research

One day …
Children at school will ask:
What is war?
You will answer them.
You will tell them:
Those words are not used any more.
Like stagecoaches, galleys or slavery.
Words no longer meaningful … — (Martin Luther King,15th January 1929-4th April 1968.) Continue reading

The Guardian vs. the Conventional Wisdom on Venezuela By Alex Main

17 January 2013CEPR

Earlier this month my colleague Dan Beeton noted that the major media, after incorrectly predicting a close race in Venezuela’s presidential elections, had quickly reverted to the familiar “gloom and doom” predictions for Venezuela’s economic future.  Additionally, many recent opinion and news pieces have echoed the Venezuelan opposition’s view that the decision to postpone Chávez’s inauguration was legally questionable.  On January 8th, a Chicago Tribune editorialneatly summarized the prevailing wisdom: “Venezuela after Chavez will likely be plagued by political turmoil and economic struggle.”

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All 27 UK Foreign Affairs lawyers: Iraq war unlawful. Obama, politicians, US media: no response By Carl Herman

28 January 2010 — The Examiner

All the lawyers in the <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>UK’s <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Foreign Affairs Department concluded the <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>US/<strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>UK invasion of <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Iraq was an unlawful War of Aggression. Their expert advice is the most qualified to make that legal determination; all 27 of them were in agreement. This powerful judgment of unlawful war follows the Dutch government’s recent unanimous report and UN Secretary General Kofi Annan’s clear statements.  

The Legal Creation of Race in America By Devon DB

30 November, 2012 Global Research

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When examining history, it seems that a narrative has evolved over time that slavery somehow just happened in the United States due to the need for cheap labor and that Africans were chosen because they could do that labor the best. While this is true, it is far from the full reality of the situation. Like <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>slavery, <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>race took time to be created and accepted by the population and like <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>slavery; <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>race had to be created from a legal framework. For this, we need look no further than colonial Virginia.

 

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U.S. Election: Sawant, Stein, and Post-2012 Left Strategy By Pham Binh

13 November 2012The Bullet • Socialist Project • E-Bulletin No. 729

With more than 16,000 votes (a whopping 28 per cent of the vote), the campaign of Socialist Alternative’s Kshama Sawant in Washington’s 43rd legislative district is a bright beacon of hope on the otherwise bleak horizon of the 2012 election for the American left, although you wouldn’t know it by reading the party-line and left-liberal news outlets. Both focus on praising/blasting the two major parties and take solace in a handful of progressive initiatives that passed in a few states while occasionally mourning the poor performance of third parties nationally. Continue reading

Millions Still Without Power As Temperature Nears Freezing In Eastern US By Bill Van Auken

<p class=”style1 style3″>5 November, 2012 — WSWS.org
<p class=”style1″><span class=”style3″>One week after Hurricane Sandy pummeled the Eastern Seaboard of the United States with high winds and a record storm surge, nearly two million homes and businesses remain without power in New <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Jersey, <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>New York and Connecticut as temperatures fall near the freezing mark.
<p class=”style1″> Continue reading

Australia’s Uranium Bonanza: Making the World a More Dangerous Place By John Pilger

24 October, 2012 — Global Research

The Australian parliament building reeks of floor polish. The wooden floors shine so virtuously they reflect the cartoon-like portraits of prime ministers, bewigged judges and viceroys. Along the gleaming white, hushed corridors, the walls are hung with Aboriginal art: one painting after another as in a monolithic gallery, divorced from their origins, the irony brutal. The poorest, sickest, most incarcerated people on earth provide a façade for those who oversee the theft of their land and its plunder.

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Apartheid never died in South Africa. It inspired a world order upheld by force and illusion By John Pilger

19 September 2012 — John Pilger

The murder of 34 miners by the <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>South African police, most of them shot in the back, puts paid to the illusion of post-apartheid democracy and illuminates the new worldwide apartheid of which <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>South <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Africa is both an historic and contemporary model.

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How the Chosen Ones ended Australia’s Olympic Prowess and Revealed a Secret Past By John Pilger

8 August, 2012 — Global ResearchJohn Pilger

The ferries that ply the river west of Sydney Harbour bear the names of Australia’s world champion sportswomen. They include the Olympic swimming gold-medalists Dawn Fraser and Shane Gould, and runners Betty Cuthbert and Majorie Jackson. As you board, there is a photograph of the athlete in her prime, and a record of her achievements. This is vintage Australia. Often shy and never rich, sporting heroes were nourished by a society that, long before most other countries, won victories for ordinary people: the first 35-hour working week, child benefits, pensions, secret ballots and, with New Zealand, the vote for women. By the 1960s, Australians had the most equitable spread of personal income in the world. In modern-day corporate Australia, this is long forgotten. “We are the chosen ones,” sang a choir promoting the 2000 Sydney Olympics.

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