Police State UK: New threats against the Guardian newspaper and Snowden in Westminster debate By Chris Marsden

2 November 2013 — WSWS

Wednesday’s debate in parliament’s Westminster Hall on oversight of Britain’s intelligence services was meant as a rebuttal to that initiated last week by Conservative MP Julian Smith on whether the Guardian had endangered national security by publishing surveillance leaks from Edward Snowden.

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Media Lens: Forever Groundhog Day For Climate? A Tale Of Ice, Smokescreens And Rebellion By David Cromwell

12 February 2013 — Media Lens

A spectacular event captured on film in a new documentary, ‘Chasing Ice’, depicts the stark impact of global warming on the Arctic. The stunning sequence shows the largest glacier calving event ever filmed. An on-screen graphic emphasises the huge scale of the ice collapse: Continue reading

The West and the Glorification of Terrorism By Thierry Meyssan

3 August, 2012 — Voltaire Network

The U.N. Security Council met shortly after the July 18 attack that decapitated the command of the Syrian security forces. The two sessions that followed addressed the Resolution proposals submitted by the Western powers and Russia. It was incumbent upon the Council to condemn terrorist action on principle, as it does in all similar circumstances. The practice is to unanimously adopt a declaration and have it read by the sitting president of the Council, in this case the Columbian, Nestor Osorio. Protocol dictates that he present his condolences to the member state under attack.

The EyeOpener- The Future of the Web (and what you can do about it)

26 June 2012 — www.boilingfrogspost.com

In mid-2012, in the wake of the ratification of ACTA and the proposal in the US of bills like SOPA and PIPA, in an age where the war on terror is gradually morphing into a cyberwar and database hacks, password leaks and identity thefts are reported on breathlessly, it is difficult to imagine the promise that the very idea of the Internet once aroused in the public. Just 20 years ago, in the age of the much-vaunted “Information Superhighway,” people could pontificate with a straight face on the potential for online communities to give rise to a Jeffersonian revolution and spawn a new flowering of civic participation.

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Role of mass media in Syrian conflict By Yekaterina Kudashkina

7 March, 2012  — Voice of Russia

Interview with Aisling Byrne – projects coordinator with the Conflicts Forum coming to us all the way from Beirut.

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Aisling, thank you very much for joining us. So, as far as I understand the United States has dismissed the results of the referendum saying it was cynical because it took place while the Syrian Government guns, tanks and artillery were still firing in Homs and other cities. So, basically that’s what the statement said.

I think that what we continue to see is that there are two sides to this media war and much of the conflict in Syria is a media war. For example if you read certain newspapers or websites and look at certain television stations you will see everything by essentially the mouthpieces of the Syrian opposition. And if you look at the other television stations or websites, or publications – you will see reporting given from both sides.

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Abstractions Versus the “Real World”: Economic Models and the Apologetics of Greed By Prof John Kozy

13 February 2012 — Global Research

Economists build models by subtracting from reality the characteristics they deem unessential to the economic situations they model. The result is a bare bones description consisting of what economists deem economically essential. Everything that is discarded (not taken into consideration in the model) is called an “externality.” So the models only work when the externalities that were in effect before the models are implemented do not change afterward. The realm of economic models can be likened to the realm of Platonic Ideas. Both realms are static and unchanging throughout all time. Unfortunately the real world constantly changes. Since externalities are excluded from all economic models and can be expected to change after any model is implemented, all economic models necessarily fail. Economists are frauds and economics amounts to nothing but an apologetics of greed.

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Abstractions Versus the "Real World": Economic Models and the Apologetics of Greed By Prof John Kozy

13 February 2012 — Global Research

Economists build models by subtracting from reality the characteristics they deem unessential to the economic situations they model. The result is a bare bones description consisting of what economists deem economically essential. Everything that is discarded (not taken into consideration in the model) is called an “externality.” So the models only work when the externalities that were in effect before the models are implemented do not change afterward. The realm of economic models can be likened to the realm of Platonic Ideas. Both realms are static and unchanging throughout all time. Unfortunately the real world constantly changes. Since externalities are excluded from all economic models and can be expected to change after any model is implemented, all economic models necessarily fail. Economists are frauds and economics amounts to nothing but an apologetics of greed.

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Media Lens: UN ‘Travesty’: Resolutions Of Mass Destruction – Part 1

14 February, 2012 — Media Lens

Media Lens: UN ‘Travesty’: Resolutions Of Mass Destruction – Part 1

It has been said that compassion is ‘the only beauty that truly pleases’ (Aryasura, The Marvelous Companion, Dharma Publishing, 1983, p.305). While beauty ordinarily provokes the fiery itch of desire or the sullen shadow of envy, compassion is cooling, blissful, inspiring awe and wonder. It implies an ability to stand outside our own needs as observers, to perceive the suffering of others as of equal or greater importance. But like all forms of beauty, compassion can be faked, exploited.

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