DWP tells GPs not to support benefit claimants with sick notes By Sue Jones

16 February 2019 — Welfare Weekly

“This callous and unjustified approach to social administration is destroying people’s lives”, writes Sue Jones.

Yesterday on Twitter, I posted one of my previous posts –Jobcentre tells GP to stop issuing sick notes to patient assessed as ‘fit for work’ and he died–in which I discuss a letter addressed to a GP regarding a seriously ill patient. It said:

“We have decided your patient is capable of work from and including January 10, 2016.

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Felicia Kornbluh on the Politics of Welfare

19 August 2016 — FAIR

Welfare Reform

(image: Matt Wuerker)

This week on CounterSpin: It was 20 years ago this month that Bill Clinton eliminated the federal guarantee of assistance to poor families. Corporate media played a key role in persuading the public that Aid to Families with Dependent Children—representing less than 1-and-a-half percent of federal outlay from 1964 to 1994—was somehow bleeding the country dry.

Now we’re told we’re in a moment of reconsideration—of tough-on-crime policies, of the deregulation of banks and, perhaps, of the notion that depriving needy people of assistance would lead to their gainful employment and well-being. Our guest says a true reconsideration of the 1990s welfare overhaul would require a so-far invisible recentering of the people in its crosshairs: low-income women, particularly mothers raising children on their own. Continue reading

The Tories, as usual, punishing the poor simply because they are poor!

1 October 2014 — 38 Degrees

A new campaign has just been launched to stop the Conservatives from changing the way benefits are paid if they win the next election. 38 Degrees member Llewelyn is demanding they scrap plans for benefits to be put onto prepaid cards, which could only be used to buy certain products in certain shops.

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The ‘Bedroom Tax’: A Two-Pronged Attack By Insa Koch

1 September 2013 — New Left Project

The ‘bedroom tax’, which was implemented on the 1 April 2013, has been widely criticised as a fundamental attack on the welfare state in Britain. It exposes many people to the risk of losing their houses, threatening to break up family homes and communities. But there is also another problem with the ‘bedroom tax’ which has been largely overlooked: in addition to undermining the welfare state, it fosters feelings of resentment which may well reinforce social divisions among the most marginalised sectors of society.

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BBC welfare reform show breached impartiality guidelines

30 July 2013 — BBC

The Trust’s editorial standards committee said that while there was no evidence that Humphrys advocated the coalition government’s reforms, viewers were likely to have formed the impression that there was a “healthy supply of jobs overall” in the UK economy because no information was given on the ratio of jobs to applicants.

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UK government set on deeper cuts to welfare By Julie Hyland

20 July 2013 — WSWS

Britain’s Conservative Party has set out plans to escalate the government’s assault on welfare.

Earlier this week, Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps said unemployed parents should only receive benefit for their first two children, meaning entitlement to child benefit and/or income support and other financial aid could potentially be removed for any children above that number.

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