The Wrong Economic Prescriptions: Deeper Austerity as a “Solution” to Austerity By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers

21 February 2013 — Global Research

Leeches could also be used in bloodletting. The withdrawal of so much blood as to induce syncope (fainting) was considered beneficial, and many sessions would only end when the patient began to swoon.

As the economy shows signs of recession, the leeches return. Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles have issued a new report calling for even deeper austerity. It is not what the economy needs as it stagnates and sputters toward a possible new collapse. Their report combined with President Obama’s State of the Union, the sequestration and Republican dogma are all combining to bring on another round of budget cuts, which will only make recession more likely. Continue reading

Austerity Can’t Solve Crises of Capitalism By Gene Clancy

8 February, 2013 IACenter.org

Millions of workers across the United States received a rude and unpleasant jolt this January when they discovered that their take-home pay had just shrunk by 2 percent. The Social Security payroll tax cut of 2009 was restored, costing workers an average amount of $850 a year, a significant wage decrease for workers on the edge of financial ruin.

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Al-Nusra Mass Executions of Abducted Citizens in Aleppo: Syria Calls on UN Security Council

31 January 2013SANA

Foreign and Expatriates Ministry on Wednesday sent two identical letters to President of The UN security Council and UN Secretary General on the mass execution perpetrated by terrorist groups of “Jabhat al-Nusra” against tens of abducted citizens in Aleppo on Tuesday and throwing their bodies in Qweiq river in Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood.

 

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Why Do Poor People Living in an Abandoned Skyscraper So Outrage the New Yorker? By Jim Naureckas

New Yorker article on Hugo Chavez

25 January 2013FAIR Blog

Jon Lee Anderson is a reporter I’ve long admired–since reading Inside the League: The Shocking Expose of How Terrorists, Nazis and Latin American Death Squads Have Infiltrated the World Anti-Communist League, which he co-wrote in 1986. But his latest piece for the New Yorker, “Slumlord: What Has Hugo Chavez Wrought in Venezuela?” (1/28/13–subscription required), reads almost like a parody of corporate media coverage of an official enemy state.

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The Age of the Siege: Sanctions Are An Act Of War by Felicity Arbuthnot

13 January, 2013

“Disengage, avoid, and withhold support from whatever abuses, degrades and humiliates humanity.” (Alice Walker, b: 1944)

“[former Danish PM and Secretary General of NATO] Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Du har blod på dine hænder” ( “You have blood on your hands”), Danish protester, 2003.

The siege of Leningrad is still considered the most lethal siege in world history, a shocking “racially motivated starvation policy”, described as: “an integral part of Nazi policy in the Soviet Union during World War II.”

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Legal Imperialism” and International Law: Legal Foundations for War Crimes, Debt Collection and Colonization By Prof. James Petras

3 December, 2012 — Global Research

Introduction

By now we are familiar with imperial states using their military power to attack, destroy and occupy independent countries.  Boatloads of important studies have documented how imperial countries have seized and pillaged the resources of mineral-rich and agriculturally productive countries, in consort with multi-national corporations.  Financial critics have provided abundant data on the ways in which imperial creditors have extracted onerous rents, royalties and debt payments from indebted countries and their taxpayers, workers, employees and productive sectors.

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The Death Agony of Anti-Imperialism, 2 Egypt, 1 By S. Artesian

17 November, 2012 — Wolf at the Door
 
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1.   The organization of landed property, of the landed estate, and of landed labor in <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Egypt was driven and determined by that which could not truly be appropriated as property—water.  Water and the lack thereof, regulated, so to speak, the oscillations between scarcity and abundance.  Water and the lack thereof imposed an approximate egalitarianism; a communalism among those who settled along the banks of the Nile, just as water and the lack thereof compelled a rough equality among the Bedouins, the nomads of the desert. Continue reading