HBO’s ‘Welcome to Chechnya’ is latest anti-Russian Cold War propaganda

29 August 2020 — Off Guardian

Max Parry

In 2017, explosive allegations first emerged that the authorities of the Chechen Republic were reportedly interning gay men in concentration camps. After a three year period of dormancy, the accusations have resurfaced in a new feature-length documentary by HBO Films entitled Welcome to Chechnya.

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ISIS to the Rescue By Tony Cartalucci

4 September 2014 — Land Destroyer

Amid NATO’s failures in Ukraine, America’s terrorist mercenaries threaten war with Russia

As the crisis in Ukraine continues to fare poorly for Kiev and its NATO-backers, an “unlikely” ally has emerged – ISIS. Threatening to “liberate” Chechnya and the Caucasus, ISIS would essentially be handing over regions of Russia to its Western and Persian Gulf sponsors. While one would imagine the West would attempt to at least appear to stand in solidarity with Russia in the face of this recent threat, it has instead used the threat to stir fear among Russians, and as leverage against Moscow.

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The other Tsarnaevs in waiting By Wayne MADSEN

13 May 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

It is now clear that the brothers Tamerlan and Dhokhar Tsarnaev were part of a joint Central Intelligence Agency – George Soros Open Society Institute (OSI) operation to launch terrorist attacks inside the Russian Caucasus region, primarily in Chechnya and Dagestan. Along the way, the Tsarnaevs appeared to have been diverted into conducting a «false flag» terrorist attack in Boston or were indoctrinated into Salafist beliefs by Saudi handlers. Such «blow back» events, if that was the case in Boston, is to similar events where the CIA’s. «Al Qaeda» allies have turned on their masters and conducted major attacks, such as that launched against the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya last September 11.

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Stop NATO News: February 29, 2012: “Nightmare For Invader”: Georgia Is NATO States’ Window To Caucasus

29 February 2012 — Stop NATO

  • Attacks On Syria, Iran Would Overwhelm Armenia With Refugees
  • Russian Expert: Azerbaijan’s Territory May Be Used To Strike Iran
  • “Nightmare For Invader”: Georgia Is NATO States’ Window To Caucasus
  • Georgian Foreign Minister In Israel To Discuss “Regional Security Issues”
  • Saakashvili: NATO Afghan Operation Provides Training For Local Conflicts
  • Labor Party Calls On Opposition To Demand Georgia’s Afghan Withdrawal

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Libyan war updates/Stop NATO news: July 1, 2011

1 July 2011 — Stop NATO

  • Libya: 13,324 NATO Sorties, 5,005 Strike Missions
  • NATO Preparing Ground Operation In Libya: Russian Envoy
  • NATO Chief: Main Objective Is To Topple Libyan Government
  • Saudis Tell NATO Of ‘Untold, Dramatic Consequences’ Regarding Iran
  • Singapore Troops Decorated For Serving NATO In Afghanistan
  • NATO’s Caucasus, Central Asia Representative Headed To Azerbaijan

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New at Strategic Culture Foundation 29 January – 4 February, 2011

5 February, 2011 — Strategic Culture Foundation

A Thaw in Kashmir or Shimmering Volcano?

04.02.2011 | 08:39 | MAHAPATRA Aurobinda (India)
Last year till the end of August, the Kashmir valley witnessed some of worst incidents in a decade with loss of more than hundred lives… The developments this year has further raised the issue whether peace in Kashmir will remain as fragile as it is, or there will be something spectacular as in the fashion of some north African Arab countries… Reportedly, the users of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter in Kashmir have widely circulated the recent protests in Tunisia and Egypt…
more

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US-NATO versus Russia: Towards a Regional War in the Caucasus? By Eric Walberg

9 March, 2010 — Global Research

Georgia is eager for another war, but there are other fires there which refuse to die — Russia’s battles with terrorism and separatists and Azerbaijans bleeding wound in ethnic Armenian Nagorno Karabakh.

The Russian Federation republics of Chechnya, Dagestan, North Ossetia and Ingushetia have experienced a sharp increase in assassinations and terrorist bombings in the past few years which have reached into the heart of Russia itself, most spectacularly with the bombing of the Moscow-Leningrad express train in January that killed 26.

Last week police killed at least six suspected militants in Ingushetia. Dagestan has especially suffered in the past two years, notably with the assassination of its interior minister in last June and the police chief last month. The number of armed attacks more than doubled last year. In February, Russian President Dmitri Medvedev replaced Dagestan president Mukhu Aliyev with Magomedsalam Magomedov, whose father Magomedali led Dagestan from 1987-2006. Aliyev was genuinely popular, praised for his honesty and fight against corruption, but was seen as too soft on terror.

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Georgia vs Russia: Fanning the flames By Eric Walberg

2 March, 2010 — Eric Walberg

Will there be another war in the Caucasus? This is a smoldering issue on more than one front, finds Eric Walberg, in the first of a two-part analysis of the spectre of conflict in this crucial crossroads

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world expected a new era of peace and disarmament. But what happened? Instead of diminishing, US and NATO presence throughout Europe, the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan and Central Asia rapidly increased, and the world experienced one war after another — in the Caucasus, Yugoslavia, Iraq and Afghanistan, each one hotter and more horrible than the last. And we are far from seeing the end to the savagery now unleashed by the anti-communist jinni.

Though a pokey backwater for the past millennium, the south Caucasus is now a key battleground, the “critical strategic crossroads in 21st century geopolitics”, writes analyst Rick Rozoff, the focus of ambitious energy transit projects and a military corridor reaching from Western Europe to East Asia, controlled (or not so “controlled”) from Washington and Brussel.

Surely peace in this vital region should be a paramount goal for both Russia and the West, for their own reasons — Russia because, well because it is there and its cultural and economic links are vital to Russia’s well being. The US, if only to benefit economically, since peace everywhere is a boon to economic well being and logically should be blessed by the world’s superpower, whether or not it is a benevolent one.

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Confronting Russia? U.S. Marines In The Caucasus By Rick Rozoff

4 September, 2009 — Global Research

On August 21 the chief of the U.S. Marine Corps, General James Conway, arrived in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi to begin the training of his host country’s military for deployment to the Afghan war theater under the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF).

“During the meeting the sides discussed a broad spectrum of Georgian-U.S bilateral relations and the situation in Georgia’s occupied territory.”[1] Occupied territory(ies) meant Abkhazia and South Ossetia, now independent nations with Russian troops stationed in both.

Conway met with Georgian Defense Minister Davit (Vasil) Sikharulidze, who on the same day gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said that the training provided by the U.S. Marine Corps could be employed, in addition to counterinsurgency operations in South Asia, in his country’s “very difficult security environment.”

Associated Press reported that “Asked if he was referring to the possibility of another war with Russia, he said, ‘In general, yes.'”

The Georgian defense chief added, “This experience will be important for the Georgian armed forces itself — for the level of training.”[2]

Sikharulidze was forced to retract his comments within hours of their utterance, and not because they weren’t true but because they were all too accurate. The Pentagon was not eager to have this cat be let out of the bag.

Three days later American military instructors arrived in Georgia on the heels of the visit of Marine Commandant Conway, whose previous campaigns included the 2003 invasion of Iraq and the first assault on Fallujah in that nation in 2004.

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