Terror from the far right in the Weimar Republic By Barbara Manthe

21 November 2018 — Open Democracy

The approval and performance of politically-motivated violence has been a core element of fascist or antisemitic activism for a century.

German Democratic Republic stamp commemorating the murders of Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxembourg, 1949. Wikicommons. Some rights reserved.

This month, the German public not only commemorated the centenary of World War One’s conclusion on 11/11, but also the foundation of the first democratic system on German territory – the Weimar Republic – which was proclaimed two days earlier, on 9 November, 1918. This republic only existed for a bit more than fourteen years and was threatened by radical right violence and terror from the very beginning, to which it ultimately succumbed.

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Michael Hudson: “Moral Hazard” vs Mutual Aid – How the Bronze Age Saved itself from debt serfdom

20 November 2018 — Naked CapitalismMichael Hudson

By Michael Hudson, a research professor of Economics at University of Missouri, Kansas City, and a research associate at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. His latest book is “and forgive them their debts”: Lending, Foreclosure and Redemption from Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year  Jointly posted with Hudson’s website

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The Plot to Kill Martin Luther King: “We All Knew He [Ray] Was Not the Shooter”; By William Pepper and Michael Welch

7 April 2018 — Global Research

A Conversation with William Pepper on Global Research

Global Research News Hour episode 215

“And who is to know how a jury ruled

Pronouncing justice long delayed

When a media establishment schooled

By their absence the truth waylaid.”

-Dr. William Pepper (quoted in The Plot to Kill King) [1]

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Agneta: Age is not a ticket out of the struggle…

5 April 2018 — Films for Action

Agneta is a documentary film about the life of the now 80-year-old Swedish peace activist Agneta Norberg. Through Agneta’s extraordinary and humorous personality, the documentary explores questions of what it means to be an activist, how a third world war can be avoided, and what it takes for people with dissenting views to make their voices heard in the 21st century.

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‘Good’ and ‘bad’ war – and the struggle of memory against forgetting By John Pilger

12 February 2014 — John Pilger

Fifty years ago, E.P. Thompson’s ‘The Making of the English Working Class’ rescued the study of history from the powerful. Kings and queens, landowners, industrialists, politicians and imperialists had owned much of the public memory. In 1980, Howard Zinn’s ‘A People’s History of the United States’ also demonstrated that the freedoms and rights we enjoy precariously – free expression, free association, the jury system, the rights of minorities – were the achievements of ordinary people, not the gift of elites.

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The Absent Voices of the Imperial War Museums By Shah Jahan

13 August 2013 — New Left Project

The brainchild behind the Imperial War Museum, Sir Alfred Mond, said on its launch in June 1920: ‘The Museum was not conceived as a monument of military glory, but rather as a record of toil and sacrifice.’ Though he dedicated it to ‘the people of the Empire, as a record of their toil and sacrifice through these fateful years’, the Museum’s Board of Trustees was filled with British government appointees and a handful of representatives from colonial and dominion  governments. The ‘people’, whether of the Empire or Britain, had no say in how their toil and sacrifice was depicted. Continue reading

A Socialist Programme for London? By Carl Rowlands

30 July 2013 — New Left Project

It is easily forgotten that the 1980s were nearly not the 1980s at all, politically speaking. At the decade’s outset, an aggressively organised, ideologically diverse Left insurgency was the ascendent force in a Labour Party hovering around 50% in opinion polls, as the British public recoiled from the initial, monetarist-brutalist phase of Thatcherism.

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The CIA in Australia: The UKUSA Agreement between the US, the UK and Australia

20 November 1986 — williambowles.info

With all the furore over Assange, Manning and now Snowden, the US’s role in subverting foreign governments goes back decades. Here’s a long piece I’m republishing on the CIA’s role in overthrowing the Gough Whitlam’s Labour government back in the 1970s, an event reprised in 2010 when “Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd was removed from office in an inner-Labor Party coup orchestrated, literally overnight, by a tiny cabal of union and party factional bosses” with US assistance of course. — Three years since the US-backed coup against Australian Labor PM

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Day of the people: Gracchus Babeuf and the communist idea By Doug Enaa Greene

20 February 2013Links International

“We Communists, united in the Third International, consider ourselves the direct continuators of the heroic endeavors and martyrdom of a long line of revolutionary generations from Babeuf – to Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg.”[1]

Gracchus babeuf1

February 20, 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal — The above words were spoken by Leon Trotsky during the opening session of the Third International in Moscow in March 1919. While Trotsky was speaking, the young Soviet Republic was fighting desperately for its life against counter-revolutionary White Armies and foreign intervention. The Soviet Republic was also struggling to maintain itself in the midst of economic breakdown and famine.

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Books: Transitional Demands from 1695 By Carl Rowlands

20 November 2012 — New Left Project

John Bellers, 1654 to 1725, ed. George ClarkeSessions Book Trust, 1993.

Despite being described by Karl Marx as a ‘phenomenon of political economy’ and regarded by Robert Owen as the forefather of his own co-operative socialist experiments, John Bellers has often been disregarded as a social reformer and theorist. I would argue, however, that contemporary readers may draw value from his work, which had to wait hundreds of years to be properly and sympathetically collated, albeit only through a fairly limited print run in 1993. 

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