The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact: 80 Years Of Fighting Against Russia

23 August 2019 — Oriental Review

The debate on the Treaty of Non-aggression between Germany and the USSR have been deliberately whipped up by the West as an opportunity to lodge various historical, political and even financial grievances with Russia and discredit the country’s foreign and domestic policies. To that end, a series of resolutions were passed between 2006 and 2009 by PACE, the European Parliament, and the Parliamentary Assembly of the OSCE. In these resolutions, the political structure of the USSR in the 1930s and 1940s was compared to the Nazi regime in Germany, responsibility for the outbreak of World War II was placed on both countries, and the date the treaty was signed – 23 August 1939 – was declared the European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism.

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The BBC slanders the English Revolution: a reply by Alan Woods – part two

24 July 2019 — In Defence of Marxism

Alan Woods

Image: public domain

This is the second part of Alan Woods’ reply to the BBC’s documentary, ‘Charles I, Downfall of a King’. The programme presents a slanderous and misleading account of the English Revolution, which resulted in the death of the corrupt and arrogant King Charles, crippled the feudal system, and laid the basis for modern democracy. Click here for part one.

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The BBC slanders the English Revolution: a reply by Alan Woods – part one

24 July 2019 — In Defence of Marxism

By Alan Woods

Image: public domain

I did not believe that it was possible for the low esteem in which I hold modern academics in general, and bourgeois historians in particular, to sink any lower than it already was. But that belief was misplaced. I have just had the misfortune to watch a three-part series put out by BBC Channel Four with the title: ‘Charles I, Downfall of a King’. I now hold the intellectual qualities of our modern historians at a slightly lower level than those of Mr Bean. At least Mr Bean can be mildly amusing at times, but our self-appointed intellectuals lack even that redeeming virtue.

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Agricultural Memory and Sustainability By Dr. Kelly Reed

31 May 2019 — The Ecologist

Archaeologists, historians and anthropologists have an important role to play in the decision-making around how we build a sustainable food future.

A significant overhaul of the current global food system is needed to meet the challenges of feeding a growing world population and many stress that this is only achievable by changing diets, food production and reducing food waste. 

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Book Review: The roots of Fascism and the seeds for its defeat

12 December 2018 — John Riddell

Zetkin bookA review of  ‘Fighting Fascism’ by Clara Zetkin

By Elizabeth Schulte: With the rise of the right internationally, there has never been a more pressing need for clarity about the roots of fascism, its history, and why and how it can be defeated. Among the clearest thinkers on this subject is German socialist Clara Zetkin, whose writing on the topic has been republished thanks to the work of Mike Taber, John Riddell and Haymarket Books.

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Terror from the far right in the Weimar Republic By Barbara Manthe

21 November 2018 — Open Democracy

The approval and performance of politically-motivated violence has been a core element of fascist or antisemitic activism for a century.

German Democratic Republic stamp commemorating the murders of Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxembourg, 1949. Wikicommons. Some rights reserved.

This month, the German public not only commemorated the centenary of World War One’s conclusion on 11/11, but also the foundation of the first democratic system on German territory – the Weimar Republic – which was proclaimed two days earlier, on 9 November, 1918. This republic only existed for a bit more than fourteen years and was threatened by radical right violence and terror from the very beginning, to which it ultimately succumbed.

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Michael Hudson: “Moral Hazard” vs Mutual Aid – How the Bronze Age Saved itself from debt serfdom

20 November 2018 — Naked CapitalismMichael Hudson

By Michael Hudson, a research professor of Economics at University of Missouri, Kansas City, and a research associate at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. His latest book is “and forgive them their debts”: Lending, Foreclosure and Redemption from Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year  Jointly posted with Hudson’s website

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The Plot to Kill Martin Luther King: “We All Knew He [Ray] Was Not the Shooter”; By William Pepper and Michael Welch

7 April 2018 — Global Research

A Conversation with William Pepper on Global Research

Global Research News Hour episode 215

“And who is to know how a jury ruled

Pronouncing justice long delayed

When a media establishment schooled

By their absence the truth waylaid.”

-Dr. William Pepper (quoted in The Plot to Kill King) [1]

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Agneta: Age is not a ticket out of the struggle…

5 April 2018 — Films for Action

Agneta is a documentary film about the life of the now 80-year-old Swedish peace activist Agneta Norberg. Through Agneta’s extraordinary and humorous personality, the documentary explores questions of what it means to be an activist, how a third world war can be avoided, and what it takes for people with dissenting views to make their voices heard in the 21st century.

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‘Good’ and ‘bad’ war – and the struggle of memory against forgetting By John Pilger

12 February 2014 — John Pilger

Fifty years ago, E.P. Thompson’s ‘The Making of the English Working Class’ rescued the study of history from the powerful. Kings and queens, landowners, industrialists, politicians and imperialists had owned much of the public memory. In 1980, Howard Zinn’s ‘A People’s History of the United States’ also demonstrated that the freedoms and rights we enjoy precariously – free expression, free association, the jury system, the rights of minorities – were the achievements of ordinary people, not the gift of elites.

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The Absent Voices of the Imperial War Museums By Shah Jahan

13 August 2013 — New Left Project

The brainchild behind the Imperial War Museum, Sir Alfred Mond, said on its launch in June 1920: ‘The Museum was not conceived as a monument of military glory, but rather as a record of toil and sacrifice.’ Though he dedicated it to ‘the people of the Empire, as a record of their toil and sacrifice through these fateful years’, the Museum’s Board of Trustees was filled with British government appointees and a handful of representatives from colonial and dominion  governments. The ‘people’, whether of the Empire or Britain, had no say in how their toil and sacrifice was depicted. Continue reading