The Salisbury Poisonings: Skripal drama framed as anti-Russian propaganda

27 June 2020 — WSWS

By Thomas Scripps

In 2018, Britain published its National Security Capability Review, outlining a new “Fusion Doctrine.” This called for the “use of all our capabilities; from economic levers, through cutting-edge military resources to our wider diplomatic and cultural influence on the world’s stage” to “project our global influence.” The BBC, especially its World Service, was named as a key instrument of UK “soft power.”

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“Putin’s Gonna Get Me”

15 June 2020 — Craig Murray

Shakespeare’s heirs at the BBC produced this deathless and entirely convincing line as the climax of the first episode of “The Salisbury Poisonings”, a three part piece of state propaganda on the Skripal saga, of which I watched Part 1 as it was broadcast last night. The other two parts are to be broadcast today and tomorrow, which unusual scheduling reflects the importance our masters place on this stirring tale of the resilience of the great British nation under attack by devilish foreigners. You can watch all three episodes now on BBC iPlayer, but personally I suffer from overactive antibodies to bullshit and need a break.

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MI6 Might Become The CIA’s Proxy For Stopping Europe From Moving Towards Russia

3 June 2020 — One World

By Andrew Korybko American political analyst

MI6 Might Become The CIA
MI6’s shadowy role in four separate Russia-related fake news scandals in recent years strongly suggests that it’s being groomed to be the CIA’s proxy for stopping Europe from moving towards Russia once Nord Stream II is completed.

The Question Of Evidence When Governments Push Political Narratives

24 May 2020 — One World

The Question Of Evidence When Governments Push Political Narratives

Today, in the background of the risk of world conflict and threat to health and our way of life arising from Covid-19, it’s never been more important to be sceptical and understand evidence. Earlier in my career, I used to adjudicate financial disputes between two parties, weigh up the evidence, and decide the most likely scenario. So, in terms of what’s going on in the world, I’m interested in narratives which are open to challenge and the thinking and motives of those in power, the media, and experts behind them. And particularly how the public watching and listening process these messages.

The Skripals, Salisbury and the curious case of Dawn Sturgess’s inquest By Craig Murray

23 October 2019 — True Publica

The Skripals, Salisbury and the curious case of Dawn Sturgess's inquest

The killing of poor Dawn Sturgess was much the most serious of the events in Salisbury and Amesbury that attracted international attention. Yet nobody has been charged, no arrest warrant issued and no inquest held. The inquest for Dawn Sturgess has today been yet again postponed, for the fourth time, and for the first time no new prospective date has been given for it to open. Alarmingly, the coroner’s office are referring press enquiries to Scotland Yard’s Counter Terrorism Command – which ought to have no role in an inquest process supposed to be independent of the police.

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New Developments in the Skripal Case Reveal it for the Sham it Always Was By James ONeill

16 October 2019 — New Eastern Outlook

1072873556“The willing suspension of disbelief or the moment which constitutes poetic faith.” This has been defined as willingness to suspend one’s critical faculties and believe something surreal. Samuel Taylor Coleridge Biographic Literaric 1817.

The above quotation, now more than 200 years old, remains a perfect encapsulation of the ongoing farce (or tragedy) that is the case of Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

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‘You have to prove Putin was involved’: Met Police push back against UK blame game in Skripal saga

8 August 2019 — RT

A year and a half since the Salisbury poisoning, the UK appears to be left with egg on its face after Scotland Yard admitted it is impossible to build a criminal case due to a lack of evidence.

The Metropolitan Police scrutinized claims that an order to target former double agent Sergey Skripal and his daughter Yulia came from the top echelons of the Russian government.

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